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Georgia's Gullah-Geechee Heritage: Articles, Journals & Databases

The Gullah-Geechee are descendants of enslaved West African people who worked on coastal plantations from North Carolina to northern Florida.

 

GALILEO logo

Many of the articles, journals, and databases on this page are available through GALILEO at College of Coastal Georgia. If you are a Georgia public library user, you may not have access to everything included here. Need help with GALILEO? Ask a librarian. Also, check out the GALILEO YouTube channel for video tutorials. 

Primary Sources

A primary source is a document or object that was written or created by someone who was a participant or witness to the event. Examples of primary sources include diaries, letters, speeches, autobiographies, news footage of an event as it happened, or artifacts. (Yes, artifacts, such as pottery, or a quilt.) Ask yourself, "Did the writer or creator witness or experience the event?"

CCGA librarian Lynda Kennedy has a handy chart that will help you determine if your document is a primary source.

Selected Journals

Use GIL-Find to search for these selected e-journals: 
 
  • African American Review
  • Black American Literature Forum
  • Black History Bulletin
  • Black Issues Book Review
  • Blacks Issues in Higher Education
  • Black Renaissance = Renaissance Noire
  • Black Scholar
  • Ethnohistory
  • International Journal of African Historical Studies
  • International Journal of African Renaissance Studies
  • Journal of African American History
  • Journal of African American Men
  • Journal of African American Studies
  • The Langston Hughes Review

Illlustration of enslaved black people picking cotton

Selected Articles

Secondary Sources

A secondary source is not a first-hand or eyewitness account. This source is one step removed from the primary source. It's written after the fact. Think of a secondary source as an interpretation or analysis of a primary source. A journal article may rely on primary sources, but the article itself is a secondary source. An author who studies the speeches and diaries of a subject, and then writes a book, is creating a secondary source.

So what's a tertiary source? It's the source such as a catalog, bibliography or index that leads the researcher to primary and secondary sources.

Selected Databases