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Evaluating Information: Finding Reliable Sources

Finding Reliable Sources

Before you use information provided by a source, including articles, books, websites, etc., use the RADAR Framework and ask the following questions:

R

RATIONALE Why did the author or publisher make this information available? Who funded it? Is it biased? Are other viewpoints included?
A AUTHORITY What are the author's credentials? Is the author an expert in the field? Is the author or publisher affiliated with an educational institution or a reputable organization? Do other authors cite this author's work?
D DATE How current is the source and the research? When was the information published or last updated? Have more recent articles or books been published with updated information?
A ACCURACY Are there statements in the work that are known to be false? What do other experts say about the topic? Do other credible sources cite this work? Was it published in a peer-reviewed journal?
R

 

RELEVANCE

Is the source relevant to your research? Does the information answer your research question? Does it meet the requirements for your assignment? Who is the intended audience for the source?

 

Evaluating Information

Is it credible?

Links on Critical Thinking

Fact-Checker Sites